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That’s all folks!


The time has come to put an end to El Gore…at least partially. When I joined in June 2012, I discovered a real passion for writing reviews and I have since written close to two hundred of them (195 to be exact). Sadly, that passion has slowly faded these past six months, and while my main goal was to keep at least weekly content a thing on here, simply because I like routine and it’s always good to know that there’s a fresh album waiting for you to be discovered on each Wednesday, but my favorite pastime has become more and more of a chore for me.

However, I do not have the heart to just drop everything I’ve built over these, almost, past two years, where I’ve been doing this as a one-man-show, completely. Which is why I’ve decided to keep the machine going, but simply post reviews at random intervals while still keeping Wednesday as the general day for them to go online.

The main goal of El Gore, when it was founded in 2011, was to support the local scene, so you can still expect reviews of every local (metal/rock/punk) release and for the rest, it will most likely be just new albums of bands that I really love or the occasional “holy shit, check this out” review.

To be honest, I don’t know how long I will go on reviewing, but my aim for now is to at least get to the five year anniversary (October 4th 2016). And who knows…maybe between now and then, the passion will return and El Gore will return to its former glory. Never say never.

Either way, I would like to thank all the bands, musicians, readers and contributors who have helped make El Gore what it is today!

Yannick

Time off


Dear readers,

After another seven months straight of reviewing, it’s time for me to take a short one month break. I’ll be back with a fresh review on September 2nd!

Enjoy the summer days!

Cheers,

El Gore one-man-team

Schedule change


I’ve given this careful consideration and it’s clear to me that after managing and providing content alone for El Gore these past twelve months, I have to change the schedule a bit.

Starting next week, there will only be one guaranteed review per week, instead of the usual two, for two simple reasons:

1) aside from my full-time job, I have quite a few other hobbies that require a lot of time and, most of all, I also need some private time,t
2) the early months of the year are always kind of slow when it comes to music releases, so it’s hard to find records that I enjoy and thus want to review.

It is very likely that in the summer months, when more albums are being released, that you will get two or even three reviews a week, but for now I’d rather do one proper one, instead of half-assing two.

I can promise you one thing though: I am NOT willing to bury El Gore! Because I love doing what I do!

Last but not least, if you feel like writing reviews as a freelancer, be sure to hit me up on the Facebook page!

~The one-man El Gore team~

Win big with El Gore, again in 2014


Good morning!

Yesterday marked our last review of the year, and we would like to thank you so much for the continuous interest and support in 2014! Despite heavy staff changes, we managed to provide you with fresh reviews every single week, except the month-off in August. We are highly motivated to keep doing so in the new year as well!

What’s next, you ask? Well, today marks the start of a big competition that is going down on our Facebook page, where you can win a copy of every Luxembourgish release that came out this year, and that we wrote about, so be sure to head there right now! It’s going to go on for exactly seven days!

Next week we will publish our yearly top 5 lists and then we’ll go on a holiday break until most likely January 6th 2015, possibly a week later.

So, again, thank you from the bottom of our hearts! Good luck in the contest and have an enjoyable holiday season, if that’s what you’re into, or simply party hard during the remaining days of the year!

Read you soon!

Summer Break, as is tradition

After another 7 months of providing you with content, it is time for us to take a little one month break.

There won’t be any Trash Monday nor any planned reviews. Possibly a spontaneous one but no guarantees.

We’ll be back on September 1st with a fresh batch of reviews, so be sure to enjoy your time until then and drink a beer for or with us!

Iron Maiden Live in Roeser 01.07.2014 Concert Review

Can I play with Madness?

When the tickets for Iron Maiden (THE band that got me into Metal, when I was still a wee little lad) at the Rockhal concert site became available in February, I was one of the first to get one online. I was even happier about this, when they were sold out shortly after. Seeing Iron Maiden in a relatively small venue would surely be amazing. But then, shortly after they were sold out, den Atelier announced that they would move the concert to the Rock-A-Field site. This outraged a lot of fans who paid for something they wouldn’t get. Even more confusing was that a second band was booked as an opening act, namely Ghost from Sweden.

Let’s skip ahead a few months to the actual concert. As I had been at the Rock-A-Field festival (RAF) the weekend before, I was familiar with the site and the parking arrangements. The shuttle service worked perfectly, although the parking price was a bit steep (8€ for a few hours of parking – the three days of parking in the same spot for the RAF cost 10€ combined). When I finally arrived at the concert site, I was glad to see, that the mud from the festival weekend had disappeared and that the site looked fine. As a little premium for being one of the “lucky ones” who had acquired tickets to the Rockhal concert, I got a wristband that would consequently allow me to enter a gated off area in front of the stage. The idea behind this might have been nice, but it seemed unfair that people who bought their tickets later and paid almost the same amount of money would not be able to get closer to the stage. On the other hand this meant that we would have quite a lot of room and could enjoy the show without too much pushing from the crowd.

Ghost as an opener might have seemed as a good idea to somebody who thinks that Metal sounds all the same, but it turned out that their music and show (if you can call it a show, when everybody is wearing a mask and the singers persona is a demonic priest, who can’t break character to cheer on the masses) didn’t fit this particular billing. Don’t get me wrong, they weren’t bad, they just weren’t a good match. The organisers might have had better luck with a local band like Lost in Pain to get the audience’s juices flowing. People came to see Iron Maiden after all.

Then it was finally time for the main act. The show started with an intro video showing crumbling icebergs, invoking images of the famous Seventh Son of a Seventh Son album. Then Iron Maiden exploded onto the stage and the crowd went wild. For almost two hours, Bruce Dickinson and his band kept the audience heavily (hrhr) entertained. They played most of the tracks from the aforementioned album and most of their other hits. The Trooper (including the obligatory swinging of the Union Jack), The Number of the Beast and 2 Minutes to Midnight were all performed almost perfectly. The highlight for me was Fear of the Dark. There is nothing quite like a huge crowd of people singing and cheering together.

I hadn’t seen Iron Maiden in quite a long time and I had almost forgotten, how theatrical their shows can be. Eddie came on stage for Run to the Hills, Dickinson turned himself into Dracula, flames burst out of the floor and fireworks accompanied a few songs. Dickinson ran around on stage like he was on fire, using the multilevel stage to his advantage, and all the other band members were in constant motion, cheering on the crowd and performing semi-acrobatic moves with their instruments. This is quite impressive, considering most of them have been doing this for over 25 years.

After their main set, the band returned for an encore (starting with Aces High – including the Churchill speech). Interestingly enough they played none of the songs released after the mid 90s. Sadly the whole thing was over way too quickly and it was time to leave the area. The shuttle service was running smoothly, limiting waiting times to tolerable levels.

Although it was quite a feat, to get a huge band like Iron Maiden to play in Luxembourg, there are a few points of criticism I have to mention. I didn’t like that the organisers kept the pricing/ticket system from their RAF festival. You had to change your money into tickets (3,5€ per ticket) and you couldn’t even change them back at the end (which wasn’t mentioned when you bought them). 3,5€ for a beer or a sparkling water (no, the 1,75€ upgrade from regular water doesn’t make its sparkle shoot rainbows) is quite a lot, especially if you count how much they earn on drinks alone. At least the 7€ burger was really tasty and big enough. Ticket prices were also quite expensive, considering that you pay 50€ (which is 40€ less than what I paid) to see the same band in France. As a Luxemburgish music fan, who goes to quite a lot of concerts, I think it’s high time that people start to question the pricing policy of Den Atelier, especially since they have been overpromising for quite a while and rarely deliver exactly what they have promised.

To sum it all up: Bullshit pricing, an opening band that didn’t fit the billing and IRON MAIDEN. I say it again: IRON *fuckin* MAIDEN! Scream for me, Luxembourg!!!!

This review was written by our freelancer Yves!

Teitanblood – Death

Greetings, El Gore readers! Last time I wrote for these guys I reviewed Eyehategod’s In the Name of Suffering. Well, perhaps it’s the aficionado of awful in me, but now I bring you yet another taste of a truly dark, evil, raw pool of vermin and filth. Namely, the latest piece of work from what I consider to be one of the best, if not the best contribution that Spain has to offer when it comes to extreme music: Teitanblood. And the album? Death.

I’m most likely showing my colours by reviewing and promoting a band that’s so near home, but I honestly think that this band touches and creates in a very unique manner the most morbid and down tuned Black/Death Metal primitivism with brush-strokes of Doom that I’ve had the chance of running into in the past years.

The first time I heard of them was with their previous album, Seven Chalices. Just when I listened to the beginning, with Whore Mass and how it prepared the ground for Domains of Darkness and Ancient Evil, I knew I’d be coming back to this dense, raw, sinister, eerie, chaotic cloud of filthy, distorted, infectiously catchy riffs somewhat regularly. Hence, I discovered Death.

One could say that after looking at Teitanblood’s works, the most prominent influences on display are those derived from the bands that established the foundations for Death and Black Metal, whilst still developing their own character in this border between the two genres. There are some parts whose influences are incredibly evident, but then, if you try to strictly compare Teitanblood with that influence, or compare those influences among themselves, you can make out Teitanblood’s own sound and structures. Regardless of that, I think that the filthy aura of sheer aggression and cruel darkness that this album irradiates, with its guitars, drums and the most evil vocals I’ve heard, is unquestionable.

And the evolution that these guys have had over the years is also worth mentioning: each release is a more evolved version of the previous one in all aspects, while still keeping the essence that makes Teitanblood its own band. Exuding an old ancient evil feeling that comes across in everything they’ve done.

“It’s the point where Death Metal and Black Metal are not differenced” – Nsk (Guitars, Bass & Vocals.)



This review was written by our freelancer Victor!

Changes (not the David Bowie song)

2013 was a big year for El Gore, both for the blog but also for the people involved. As it stands now, we all have full-time job and/or university duties, which is why we decided to loosen up our schedule a bit.

Trash Monday will continue without any breaks whatsoever and one review, be it music or movie, is also guaranteed. Of course, additional content might be added in busy weeks in terms of new releases.

That’s about it! We will strive to review as much as we possibly can, but for now our personal lives need to be put first. We hope you understand!

~The El Gore team~

Eyehategod – In The Name Of Suffering

The recent passing of Eyehategod’s drummer extraordinaire Joey Lacaze has had me revisiting all of their full-length releases from the very beginnings to the latest one this week. On this first occasion of writing for El Gore, I’m going to address one of my personal favorites from all of their musical productions, and also the one we could consider as their “first”: In the Name of Suffering.

For those of you who aren’t avid listeners of anything that has to do with sludge, stoner or doom, this band and album might not exactly appeal to your senses. Hell, I’d even advise people with sensitive brain cells to stay the fuck away from it, given the risk of severe irreparable trauma. But for listeners who thrive off of listening to music of this caliber, such as myself, this one is without question an incredible dose of vein-induced raw, ton-weighting, atmospheric misanthropic loudness, with lyrics ranging from themes such as drug abuse, self-hatred, depression and suicide to misery and murder. Straight from the beginning, with hymns of sludge like “Depress”, “Man Is Too Ignorant to Exist”, “Run It into the Ground”, the brutally hilarious “Godsong” (with the guest sampled quotes of Charles Manson) to the ending, and the one I think is my personal favorite, “Left to Starve”.

In the Name of Suffering is one of the few albums out there in the extreme music world that is, for lack of a better description, authentic, original, and scary for some. Their entire style and set up leaves the listener convinced that what they are hearing is real, regardless of whether or not they like it. It’s made clear that it’s not just a group of people trying to be extreme or shocking for the sake of it. From the swamps of Louisiana and the dark corners of New Orleans, it’s legitimate piss and vinegar coming straight to your melting ears.

This very first brew made Eyehategod pioneers of heavy music, and the release itself became one of the first of its kind, and certainly an essential pillar within the family. It’s the sort of album that can, and should be appreciated for how it has influenced the genre and paved the way for a number of solid albums. It’s certainly a genre-defining release. Influencing what came after, and a testimony to how Eyehategod would only get better with posterior albums.

Highly recommended to fans of sludge, doom, stoner or drone metal in general.

This review was written by our new freelancer Victor!

Summer Break


After providing you, our beloved readers, with reviews for 31 weeks non-stop this year, we decided it’s time to take a little summer break! This means that all activity on the site will be down until the 2nd of September where we will resume in our usual rhythm! Until then: stay safe, enjoy the weather, your loved ones and cold (alcoholic) beverages! We sure will!

~The El Gore team~